SLAVERY IN NYC

Great News In East Harlem

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The 126th Street depot in East Harlem — one of New York’s oldest bus depots — will close its doors in January to become a memorial for slaves found buried there.

About 7 years ago construction workers first discovered a 17th-century African burial ground at the depot located between 1st and 2nd avenues. The MTA had planned to upgrade the dilapidated depot, which originally opened in 1947 as a trolley yard starting, next year, but community demands to convert the site into a memorial shut that down. Before that the land — once home to Harlem’s first house of worship, the ­Elmendorf Reformed Church, from 1665 until 1869 — started as a cemetery after Peter Stuyvesant ordered African slaves to build a 9-mile road from lower Manhattan to what was then an unincorporated part of the city known as “Nieuw Haarlem.”

There’s also plans to develop residential property along with the African slave memorial. A city councilman told the NY Post “We want to make sure that this piece of history — an important part of New York City history — will be preserved.”

 

 

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