Archive for African American Celebration

Kwanzaa

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 29, 2016 by jaguargold

On this day, the forth principle of Kwanzaa ask yourself, How did you express the forth principle, through out the year? Was you effective, can you improve, and how will you continue to  incorporate the 4th principle in the coming year?kwanzaaujamaa1

KWANZZA

Posted in Black History Month, Current Events, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 26, 2016 by jaguargold

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Kwanzaa: is observed from December 26th through January 1st. its focus is to pay tribute to the rich cultural roots of People of the African Diaspora.

Though first inspired by African-Americans, many of African descent celebrate this occasion today. Its reach has grown to include all whose roots are in the Motherland. Its’ concept is neither religious nor political, but is rooted strongly in a cultural awareness. This is not a substitute for Christmas; however, gifts may be exchanged with the principles of Nguzo Saba always in mind. Gifts are given to reinforce personal growth and achievement which benefits the collective community.

 

June is Black Music Month

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 3, 2016 by jaguargold

 

African-American Music Appreciation Month is celebrated throughout the month of June.  It was originally started as Black Music Month by President Jimmy Carter, who on June 7th, 1979, decreed that June would be the month of Black Music.  since then, presidents have announced to Americans to celebrate Black Music Month.  For each year of His term, President Barack Obama has announced the observance under a new title, African-American Music Appreciation Month.  Call it what you may, June is Black Music appreciation Month so Lets Celebrate.

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 8, 2014 by jaguargold

images (2)As the 2014 Winter Olympic games in Sochi, Russia begin, we will cheer on the United States Olympic Team.  We will celebrate when they win and sign when they  lose.  Some of us will just watch certain sports such as ice skating or hockey, and in between maybe watch downhill skiing, and snowboarding.  We will also take a quick look at curling and try to understand and after some time turn the channel because we still don’t get it.  We love the Olympics because the Olympics represent the best of the best and once upon a time when we were young we wish one day that would be me. We also secretly wondered where was I an African American  in a sea of the many faces that represented the different countries around the world.  Where was I represented. Since the inception of the first  Winter  Olympic Games In 1924 (France) there has only been a few African Americans who have participated in the Winter Olympic Games representing the United States.  Here they are;

DEBBIE THOMAS: ICE SKATING, BRONZE MEDAL

VONETTA FLOWERS: 2 PERSON BOBSLED, GOLD MEDAL

SHANI DAVIS: SPEED SKATING, GOLD MEDAL

Today there are 6 African Americans representing the United States in these 2014 winter  Olympic games lets support them and maybe just maybe there will be more African American participating in the Winter Olympics.

 

Celebrating Kwanzaa

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on December 28, 2012 by jaguargold

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UJIMA: COLLECTIVE WORK AND RESPONSIBILITY, ON THIS THRID DAY OF KWANZAA WE AS AFRICAN AMERICANS REFLECT ON THE BUILDING AND MAINTAING OF OUR COMMUNITY TOGETHER, MAKE OUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS PROBLEMS OUR PROBLEMS AND SOLVE THEM TOGETHER IN OTHERWORDS BE OUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS KEEPERS.

JUNETEENTH: KNOW YOUR HISTORY (June 19, 1865)

Posted in Black History Month, Current Events, Harlem, Speak To All with tags , , , , , , , on June 17, 2012 by jaguargold

A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots. “Marcus Garvey

There is a common misconception among Americans that Abraham Lincoln freed the slaves with a stroke of his pen. Yet the Emancipation Proclamation, which went into effect on Jan. 1, 1863, did no such thing — or, at least, it didn’t do a very good job of it. Two and a half years later, on June 19, 1865, Union soldiers sailed into Galveston, Texas, announced the end of the Civil War, and read aloud a general order freeing the quarter-million slaves residing in the state. It’s likely that none of them had any idea that they had actually been freed more than two years before. It was truly a day of mass emancipation. It has become known as Juneteenth.

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