Archive for African American Celebration

February is Black History Month: Slavery

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 24, 2019 by jaguargold

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Slavery in the United States was the legal institution of human enslavement primarily of Africans and African Americans, that existed in the United States of America in the 16th-19th centuries. Slavery had been practiced from the early colonial days, which began in 1619 when 20 Africans landed in the English Colony of Virginia. These individuals were not slaves but indentured servants. By the 1660s large numbers of Africans were being brought to the English Colonies.  In 1790 blacks numbered almost 760,000 and made up nearly one-fifth of the population of the United States.

With the increasing profitability of slavery and the slave trade, some Africans themselves sold captives to the European traders. The captured Africans were generally marched in chains to the coast and crowded into the holds of slave ships for the dreaded Middle Passage across the Atlantic Ocean.

An estimated 10 million Africans brought to the Americas by the Slave Trade, about 430,000 came to the territory of what is now the United States. The overwhelming majority were taken from the area of Western Africa stretching from present-day Senegal to Angola.

The 13th Amendment, adopted on December 18, 1865, officially abolished slavery, but freed blacks’ status in the post-war South remained precarious, and significant challenges awaited during the Reconstruction period.

February is Black History Month: Black Panther Party

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 17, 2019 by jaguargold

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The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense was a political organization founded by Bobby Seale and Huey Newton in October 1966.  The party was active in the United States from 1966 until 1982, with international chapters operating in the United Kingdom and Algeria.  

At its inception on October 15, 1966, the Black Panther Party’s core practice was its armed citizens’ patrols to monitor the behavior of officers of the Oakland Police Department and challenge police brutality.  In 1969, community social programs became a core activity of party members.  The Black Panther Party instituted a variety of community social programs, most extensively the Free Breakfast for Children Programs, and Community Health Clinics.  The party enrolled the most members and made the greatest impact in the Oakland-San Francisco Bay Area, New York, Los Angeles, Chicago Seattle, and Philadelphia. 

The New Black Panther Party for Self-Defense (NBPP) is a U.S.-based black nationalist organization founded in Dallas, Texas, in 1989. Despite its name, the NBPP is not an official successor to the Black Panther Party.  Members of the original Black Panther Party have insisted that the newer party is illegitimate and they have firmly declared, “There is no new Black Panther Party”.  

 

 

February is Black History Month: HBCU

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 10, 2019 by jaguargold

February is Black History Month

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 3, 2019 by jaguargold

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Victor Hugo Green (November 9, 1892 – 1960) was an African American postal employee from Harlem, New York best known for developing and writing what became known as The Green Book, a travels guide for African Americans in the United States.

In the 1930s, Green began his work by compiling data on stores and motels and gas stations in the New York City area that welcomed black travelers and published his first guide in 1936.  It was first published as The Negro Motorist Green Book and later as The Negro Travelers’ Green Book. The books were published from 1936 to 1966.

Victor Hugo Green reviewed hotels and restaurants that did business with African Americans during the time of Jim Crow Laws and racial segregation in the United States.  During the time the book was published, choices of lodging, restaurants and even gas stations were limited for black people in many places, both in the South and outside it. Green’s guide was so popular that he immediately began to expand its coverage the next year to other US destinations, adding hotel and restaurants as well.

After retiring from the Postal Service, Green continued to work on updating issues of The Green Book. In addition, he developed the related travel agency business he had established in 1947.

 

February is Black History Month

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 3, 2019 by jaguargold

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Throughout the Month of February STA=Speak to All will be posting all things, people, and places depicting everything African American (Black) History, past and present, so stay tuned.

PRINCE

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 2, 2017 by jaguargold

PRINCE: MUSICIAN, June 7th, 1958 – Apr 21, 2016 (age 57)

Prince Rogers Nelson aka Prince, an American singer-songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, philanthropist, dancer and record producer. A musical innovator known for his eclectic work, flamboyant stage presence, extravagant dress and makeup, and wide vocal range.

His music integrates a wide variety of styles, funk, rock, R&B, new wave, soul, psychedelia, and pop. He sold over 100 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling artists of all time. He won seven Grammy Awards, an American Music Award, a Golden Globe Award, and an Academy Award for the film Purple Rain. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004, his first year of eligibility. Rolling Stone ranked Prince at number 27 on its list of 100 Greatest Artists, “the most influential artists of the rock & roll era”

A musical genius whose music will live on in our hearts, memories, mind and soul.  34DE496C00000578-3629776-image-a-55_1465318001024[1]

 

June; Black Music Month

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 1, 2017 by jaguargold

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June is the official celebration of African American Music an annual celebration of African-American music in the United States.  initiated as Black Music Month by Former President Jimmy Carter who, on June 7th, 1979, decreed that June would be the month to celebrate Black Music.  Thank You Mr. Jimmy Carter. 

 

Kwanzaa

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 29, 2016 by jaguargold

On this day, the forth principle of Kwanzaa ask yourself, How did you express the forth principle, through out the year? Was you effective, can you improve, and how will you continue to  incorporate the 4th principle in the coming year?kwanzaaujamaa1

KWANZZA

Posted in Black History Month, Current Events, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 26, 2016 by jaguargold

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Kwanzaa: is observed from December 26th through January 1st. its focus is to pay tribute to the rich cultural roots of People of the African Diaspora.

Though first inspired by African-Americans, many of African descent celebrate this occasion today. Its reach has grown to include all whose roots are in the Motherland. Its’ concept is neither religious nor political, but is rooted strongly in a cultural awareness. This is not a substitute for Christmas; however, gifts may be exchanged with the principles of Nguzo Saba always in mind. Gifts are given to reinforce personal growth and achievement which benefits the collective community.

 

June is Black Music Month

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 3, 2016 by jaguargold

 

African-American Music Appreciation Month is celebrated throughout the month of June.  It was originally started as Black Music Month by President Jimmy Carter, who on June 7th, 1979, decreed that June would be the month of Black Music.  since then, presidents have announced to Americans to celebrate Black Music Month.  For each year of His term, President Barack Obama has announced the observance under a new title, African-American Music Appreciation Month.  Call it what you may, June is Black Music appreciation Month so Lets Celebrate.

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 8, 2014 by jaguargold

images (2)As the 2014 Winter Olympic games in Sochi, Russia begin, we will cheer on the United States Olympic Team.  We will celebrate when they win and sign when they  lose.  Some of us will just watch certain sports such as ice skating or hockey, and in between maybe watch downhill skiing, and snowboarding.  We will also take a quick look at curling and try to understand and after some time turn the channel because we still don’t get it.  We love the Olympics because the Olympics represent the best of the best and once upon a time when we were young we wish one day that would be me. We also secretly wondered where was I an African American  in a sea of the many faces that represented the different countries around the world.  Where was I represented. Since the inception of the first  Winter  Olympic Games In 1924 (France) there has only been a few African Americans who have participated in the Winter Olympic Games representing the United States.  Here they are;

DEBBIE THOMAS: ICE SKATING, BRONZE MEDAL

VONETTA FLOWERS: 2 PERSON BOBSLED, GOLD MEDAL

SHANI DAVIS: SPEED SKATING, GOLD MEDAL

Today there are 6 African Americans representing the United States in these 2014 winter  Olympic games lets support them and maybe just maybe there will be more African American participating in the Winter Olympics.

 

Celebrating Kwanzaa

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on December 28, 2012 by jaguargold

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UJIMA: COLLECTIVE WORK AND RESPONSIBILITY, ON THIS THRID DAY OF KWANZAA WE AS AFRICAN AMERICANS REFLECT ON THE BUILDING AND MAINTAING OF OUR COMMUNITY TOGETHER, MAKE OUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS PROBLEMS OUR PROBLEMS AND SOLVE THEM TOGETHER IN OTHERWORDS BE OUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS KEEPERS.

JUNETEENTH: KNOW YOUR HISTORY (June 19, 1865)

Posted in Black History Month, Current Events, Harlem, Speak To All with tags , , , , , , , on June 17, 2012 by jaguargold

A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots. “Marcus Garvey

There is a common misconception among Americans that Abraham Lincoln freed the slaves with a stroke of his pen. Yet the Emancipation Proclamation, which went into effect on Jan. 1, 1863, did no such thing — or, at least, it didn’t do a very good job of it. Two and a half years later, on June 19, 1865, Union soldiers sailed into Galveston, Texas, announced the end of the Civil War, and read aloud a general order freeing the quarter-million slaves residing in the state. It’s likely that none of them had any idea that they had actually been freed more than two years before. It was truly a day of mass emancipation. It has become known as Juneteenth.

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